A message from Marie - Helens Mother

To lose a loved one is devastating. To lose a loved one to murder is horrific.
To be denied their funeral causes unimaginable suffering.

I am campaigning for Helen’s Law in memory of my daughter, Helen, who was murdered in February 1988 aged 23.

Her body has never been found. Her killer has been moved to an open prison. Murder convictions without a body were once rare. Now, they are common-place as killers go to ever-increasing lengths to hide the evidence of their crimes. Unable to lay their loved one to rest plunges families into a hell that never ends.

I am begging the Government to deny parole to killers until they reveal the location of their VICTIMS.

… enabling families to lay them to rest.

PLEASE SUPPORT ME.

Thank you.            

Marie McCourt

 

 

Mum of two, Jane Harrison, 32.

Mum of two Jane Harrison, 32, of Highbury, London, disappeared on June 15 1995 – but it took 18 years for her married lover, Kevin Doherty, to be convicted of manslaughter in 2013.

In sentencing, Judge Christopher Moss said Doherty kept a "dreadful secret" of where he had hidden her body.

He is believed to have killed her then kept the body in a ‘lock-up’ before disposing of it. Jane’s heartbroken sisters, Maxine, 56, of Islington and Claire, 47, of Croydon, Surrey, have written to him in jail pleading with him to reveal her whereabouts. ‘Find it in your heart to please tell us where Jane is so we can lay her to rest and bury her with her mother and father who passed away not knowing where their beautiful daughter is,’ they implored.

Tragically, Jane was the second sibling to die tragically. “Our oldest sister, Shelley died in a car crash when I was young,” explains Claire. “But this is a completely different kind of loss. With a funeral you eventually learn to live with it. You do let go.

“But until we find Jane we will never be able to do that. My Mum lived and breathed Jane. Her heart was broken. I made a promise to her on her death bed that I would always look for Jane. And that’s what we’re going to do.

“There is no higher crime than murdering someone. To then deny their burial is inhumane.

“You pass the stage where you want revenge. All you want is your loved one back.”

When Jane – a devoted Mum - disappeared, it was completely out of character, Claire recalls. “I phoned all the hospitals that night but deep down I knew she was dead. What I didn’t know was that we would never find her.”

Twenty one years on, the pain is still as raw. “We are still in limbo - no nearer to finding Jane,” says Maxine.

“We are the ones living with this every second, every minute, of every day. He is never going to give Jane up of his own accord. This law is our only means of finding out what happened to her. It has to be passed.”